FOREDOM FLEXSHAFT MINI SERIES

Posted by Corkie Bolton on

*This post contains affiliate links.

Here is a recap of my Foredom Flexshaft Mini Series. During this five week series we delved into a variety of topics including how to choose the right flexshaft motor for your jewelry work, maintaining your flexshaft, the differences between micromotors and flexshafts, the best bits to purchase when getting started with your flexshaft and some additional accessories that are compatible with a Foredom SR motor.


CHOOSING A MOTOR

The SR is going to be the best all around option for us jewelers. It goes between 500-18,000 RPM and gives you all the power and speed variability you will need for your jewelry work. 

The TX has twice the horse power of the SR it’s designed for light industrial work like wood carving or stone carving. Great for grinding or anything where you are looking for high torque at both low and high speeds. It runs between 500-15,000 RPM.

The LX is high torque and low speed (500-5000 RPM) it is the most powerful motor they make and is ideal for using a hammer handpiece. You can use a hammer handpiece on any motor but it should never run faster than 5000 RPM or you will burnout your handpiece. So the LX gives you more variability at lower speeds which means more control. It’s not designed to do polishing at high speeds. For those that use a hammer handpiece on a daily basis an LX is a wonderful addition to your studio but I would not advise it as your sole flex shaft, it’s more of a secondary option.

SETTING UP + MAINTAINING YOUR FOREDOM FLEXSHAFT

Here is the good news: when you purchase a new one all you need to do is take it out of the box! Simply hang your motor, plug in the foot pedal and turn your motor on (I recommend leaving it in an “on” position and using the foot pedal to power!) Then attach your handpiece. No need to lubricate your brand new flex shaft, that will come into play later on when you are ready to do some maintenance. One thing I learned while researching this mini series is the optimal position for your handpiece when not in use is pointing upwards. This prevents lubrication from pooling on the key tip end of the shaft. For this reason I purchased a motor hanger with a mounting clamp (I’ll link in my stories!) It is recommended the shaft should be checked, wiped clean, and relubricated with grease every 40 hours of use. So I attached a quick video showing that process, don’t be intimidated, it is easy! 1️⃣ Be sure to cover your work surface 2️⃣ Unplug your unit from the speed control & remove the handpiece 3️⃣ Loosen the set screw at the top of the sheath (but do not remove it). Slide the sheath off & set aside. 4️⃣ Wipe the shaft down to remove any residue (I use a washcloth rag) 5️⃣ Apply a thin coat of grease from the top to approx. 6” from the bottom 6️⃣ Slide the sheath back up the shaft leaving ¾” of the shaft tip exposed from the grooved end (where the handpiece attaches) & tighten your set screw. 7️⃣ Plug the motor back into the speed control. Allow the sheath to hang vertically into a trash can. Run it for 15 minutes at high speed (without the handpiece attached) to evenly distribute the grease. 8️⃣ Remove any excess grease on the shaft piece and then attach your handpiece, and you’re all set. The other issue you might come across is if your motor sounds like it is rattling! This will require taking out and cleaning/replacing the motor brushes, also very easy! I will share an IGTV (with an impressive before and after).

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FLEXSHAFTS + MICROMOTORS


Flexshafts have more power than micromotors, they are great for tasks that require power like stone setting, hammering, and drilling. Micro motors are great for detail work as they are very flexible and fast. The handpiece is where the motor is so it allows them to have a very lightweight cord. The cord is like a phone cord very flexible and is easy to move around with. The faster speed provides smoother cuts with fluted burs. This difference between the micromotor’s lightweight cord and the flexshaft’s flexible shaft (hence the name 😂) is significant. We discussed two different options that are available for micromotors, the Foredom K1030 Portable model and the Foredom K1070 Plug In model.

TOP FIVE BITS TO PURCHASE TO GET STARTED WITH YOUR FLEXSHAFT

 1️⃣ Bristle Discs - these discs come in a variety of grits and are used with a screw mandrel. When I was starting out I used these almost exclusively to polish my work, since I didn’t have a polishing lathe back then. 2️⃣ Moore’s Snap On Sanding Discs -I use these pretty much everytime I’m at my bench. They are versatile because you can attach them with the abrasive facing up or down, and they also come in a wide variety of grits. 3️⃣ Drill Bits - these are an essential. I think investing in a quality brand is worth it, they will be longer lasting. Sets are nice when you get started as you may find you need smaller or larger ones depending on the job at hand! 4️⃣ Silicone Polishing Wheels I use these for a ton of clean up, including on bezels. I am careful with silicone to not touch the wheels to any set stones. I’ve definitely made that mistake in the past! Also please see the last image for another option Rubber Wheels, shared by @emilymarquisdesigns (last image) rubber are similar to silicone, they will not scratch a stone! 5️⃣ Split Mandrels are inexpensive and a must have for anyone starting out! You can use any grit you like and they are fantastic for quickly cleaning the inside of rings and other curved surfaces! The standard size mandrel when using these bits with an SR is 3/32 so if you are wondering if your dremel or other flexible shaft will be compatible you just need to know what size bits your collet accommodates! 

ADDITIONAL ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR FOREDOM SR FLEXSHAFT

 I wanted to discuss some additional accessories that are available and compatible with the @foredomelectric SR flexshaft! One of the most common accessories are additional handpieces! Hammer handpieces are an awesome tool for stonesetting and texturing, I have the Foredom H.15D and I love it! The difference between the H.15 and the H.15D is the latter has a duplex spring connection built-in. The benefit of that is its a bit more flexible as you work. As mentioned in a previous post if you use a hammer handpiece remember they are not meant to exceed 5000 RPMs as it can burn the handpiece out. There are also tons of different Quick Release handpieces that are compatible with the SR, they can save you a ton of time when you are changing out different bits. Another useful accessory for the SR is the @pepetools_usa Jump Ring Maker. My SR from @aajewelrysupply actually came as a kit with the Jump Ring Maker (great value!) I plan to do a video on this awesome tool soon! Foredom also makes a handpiece holder, which turns your flexshaft into a mini polishing lathe (showed this on a #tooltalktuesday awhile back)! If you rely solely on your flexshaft for polishing this holder is a great addition. 

 If you are on the fence about purchasing a flexshaft I am here to say they are game changing! The uses are endless, and it is an investment you won't regret!

You can purchase a Foredom SR from many reputable sources. Here is a link to purchase from Pepetools  and your purchase will help support the page! 

If you love this content and found it helpful, please share with a friend or on Pinterest!

Be sure to join our community on Instagram @metalsmithsociety

Read more →

METALSMITH SOCIETY'S TOP FLEXSHAFT TIPS

Posted by Corkie Bolton on

Here are some of the most popular tips about using a flexshaft for jewelry making on the Metalsmith Society page!

WHEN POLISHING WITH YOUR FLEXSHAFT USE A PIECE OF LEATHER TO PROTECT YOUR PIECE FROM GETTING SCRATCHED FROM @mcmillanmetals

POLISHING BITS TO GET INTO HARD TO REACH SPOTS FROM 
@benchtooljunkies


MOORE'S SANDING DISCS TO SAND FLAT AREAS

View this post on Instagram

For this #tooltalktuesday I wanted to more thoroughly discuss Sanding Discs. I have been using these for over a decade and they are absolutely a must have if you own a flexshaft. I use Moore’s snap on sanding discs. They come in many different grits and they snap on and off the snap mandrels for quick replacement. I love this kit from @ottofrei1930 (# 111.899) with the stand because it has three different sized discs in various grits and they are perfectly organized 😂 I know this crew likes organization! I do recommend buying extra snap mandrels because the kit only comes with two! I like to have a couple of my favorite grits mounted so I can change out even quicker. Another tip is to have a pair of pliers on hand, they are helpful for prying off the brass circle when it separates from the disc and gets stuck on the snap mandrel, and they are also helpful to pry the snap mandrel open ever so lightly when discs aren’t snapping on and staying tight anymore! You can also polish with snap on discs 🤯 with the Moore’s Magnum Polishers (# 111.995)- they are made of soft felt backed plastic and are used with polishing compounds like ordinary felt wheels. I had no idea they existed and they are amazing for getting a nice polish on a small flat area with your flexshaft. I also had the opportunity to use the 3M Micro Finish Pin Hole Disc Kit (# 111.2826) these you use with a screw mandrel. I like that I can put two on the mandrel, one facing up and one down. This allows me to work all angels! (The snap mandrels can also be quickly flipped depending on the angle you need!) I’ve found the material on these 3M discs to be a bit more long lasting than some of the paper backed sanding discs. I also bought extra screw mandrels for this kit! You can’t go wrong with any of these, I use them to remove solder, the last bit of a sprue, and for removing marks...the list goes on and on. 🙏 @ottofrei1930 is offering our community 5% off with code MMS719 if you just want to give these a whirl they sell small boxes of them for $5-$6 just be sure to also get the snap mandrels (# 110.741) let me know what you think or if you’ve ever used them! #sponsored #metalsmithsociety

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


FOREDOM H.15D HAMMER HANDPIECE

View this post on Instagram

For this week’s #tooltalktuesday I wanted to show the Foredom® H.15D hammer handpiece. This model includes the “duplex spring” which provides extra flexibility, there is also the H.15 model but I have never used it so I can’t compare the two. I do imagine the extra length and flexibility makes it a bit easier to maneuver and is perhaps easier on my wrist but I’m speculating! The handpiece comes with an anvil point, which I polished (you can use your polishing machine or a ceragloss wheel.) This included anvil with the circular shape and flat end is the one I use the most often when setting. The handpiece works with Foredom flex shafts and attaching is simple, you want to run your flex shaft at a low speed and gently pull your regular handpiece off and then run it again to place the hammer handpiece on. You use the hammer handpiece at a low speed , somewhere between 0-5,000 rpm and you can adjust the impact force from light to heavy by rotating the silver knurled adjusting ring. To interchange the anvil points you simply screw them on and off, I also purchased the Foredom Anvil Kit (with 6 anvils). This handpiece is also compatible with Badeco tips which is something I will definitely look into! I’ve only begun to experiment with my other tips but they are great not only for stone setting but also for experimenting with texture! Back to stone setting, in my example I am setting a simple tube setting, but I’ve used this hammer handpiece on heavy prongs, super thick bezels and harder metals like 14k gold. You want to start by properly securing your work, I used my @grstools Benchmate but you could also use a vise, Jett basic or your preferred method. Begin slowly, you don’t want to go too fast in a single area as it may make your bezel wonky. Practice for sure! I find I can get a lot of control and I don’t worry much about hitting my stone accidentally however I wouldn’t use this with one of my delicate opals (that’s just my personal choice, I don’t want to risk it!) It’s a super useful tool which I use on a regular basis! They sell for $149 I will include a link in my stories! Let me know if you have any questions! #metalsmithsociety

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


MAINTAINING YOUR FLEXSHAFT

View this post on Instagram

Here is a tip for maintaining your flexshaft + a  HOLIDAY GIVEAWAY (CLOSED the winner is @plus3tocharisma and their friend @soldiers.heart_2010 .heart_2010 will receive a sticker pack!)🎄😁 - I've partnered with @benchtooljunkies nchtooljunkies to give away one of their Supply Drop Boxes (this one includes Foredom Flexshaft Grease, a 3M Disc Set, custom castings from @castingdirty and a H.20 Foredom QC handpiece) + a Black Society Tote Bag, Black Enamel Pin + Society Stickers. Entering is easy, we have two steps: 1. FOLLOW @benchtooljunkies 2. Tag a friend (they will win a set of stickers as well) AND comment how long you've been making jewelry or your favorite place to take a class! I will only be counting entries that have a TAG + COMMENT :) You can get an additional entry by sharing our giveaway in your stories (please tag both @metalsmithsociety + @benchtooljunkies ) *giveaway ends 12/25 8pm EDT* Okay back to our tip - Lubricating the shaft of a Foredom flexshaft - 1️⃣ Be sure to cover your work surface 2️⃣ Unplug your unit from the speed control & remove the handpiece 3️⃣ Loosen the set screw at the top of the sheath (but do not remove it). Slide the sheath off & set aside. 4️⃣ Wipe the shaft down to remove any residue (I use a washcloth rag) 5️⃣ Apply a thin coat of grease from the top to approx. 6” from the bottom 6️⃣ Slide the sheath back up the shaft leaving ¾” of the shaft tip exposed from the grooved end (where the handpiece attaches) & tighten your set screw. 7️⃣ Plug the motor back into the speed control. Allow the sheath to hang vertically into a trash can. Run it for 15 minutes at high speed (without the handpiece attached) to evenly distribute the grease. 8️⃣ Remove any excess grease on the shaft piece and then attach your handpiece, and you’re all set. 🙋‍♀️ This was my first time ever doing this and I’ve had my flexshaft ten years, don’t be like me 😂 Thank you to @benchtooljunkies for collaborating with me, if you don’t know about them they are two hard working ladies that create awesome subscription boxes for people who create jewelry! #benchtools #jewelrytools #metalsmithsociety #ladysmith

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


SPLIT MANDREL TIP FROM @inkedupandreckless


SANDING THE INSIDE OF A RING

View this post on Instagram

For this week’s #tooltalktuesday I wanted to show off two options from @riogrande for sanding the inside of a ring (or other curved surface) with your flexshaft. Option 1️⃣: Mounted Sandpaper Cartridge Rolls. Full disclosure here, you can use a split mandrel and cut your own strips of sandpaper, but here is why I like the rolls: 1) They are a huge time saver; you don’t have to spend time cutting strips. 2) The sandpaper won’t fall off or flap around! 3) They come in grits 240-1000 and they are color coded for easy identification (I created my own chart for quick reference). Prior to using these I had unidentifiable, beat-up pieces of sandpaper all over my bench drawer 🤦‍♀️. With the cartridges, I can easily store them and quickly switch out for the next grit. You can use them to quickly sand excess solder, remove file marks and create a unified surface on the exterior or interior of your pieces. They break down to about $1.69 per mandrel so they are cost effective as well! Option 2️⃣ is a new product from @riogrande: Inside Ring Sanding Buffs. Available in two different 4-Grit Assortment Kits ( 330100 + 330099). The center of these buffs is made of Scotch-Brite™ and they have vertical flaps of sandpaper spaced evenly around the circumference. This design allows the entire ring to be sanded at the same time, meaning it’s harder to accidentally give your ring an uneven sanding. They work quickly, saving you time! These mandrels work out to about $2.50 each and the kits include three each of 80, 180, 220, and 320-grit (330099) OR 600, 800, 1,200 and 1,500-grit (330100) - giving you some variety to experiment with. The 1,200 grit will produce a nice satin finish if you're into that 🙋‍♀️ Rio is offering our community 10% off both tools if you’d like to give them a whirl 😁🙏🏻Mounted Sandpaper Cartridge Rolls in any grit (337060 – 065) and Inside Ring Sanding Buffs 4-Grit Assortment Kits (330100 and 330099) through 2/1/19 using code MTLSMITH2 (*This promo is not combinable with Rio's Cyber Sale November 23-26) Always use eye protection and please consider a mask to avoid inhalation of particles! #sponsored #metalsmithsociety #riojeweler

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


MINI POLISHING CLOTH BUFFS

View this post on Instagram

For this week’s #tooltalktuesday I wanted to show how to achieve a high polish by using Sunshine® Cloth Buffs from @riogrande on your flexshaft. These inexpensive buffs (based off of the popular cloths) are impregnated with polishing compound so you use them as is! They give off very little residue and the residue they do leave can easily be cleaned in an ultrasonic - or if you don’t have one 🙋‍♀️, some mild dish soap and a soft toothbrush. These are different than other buffs I’ve used on my flexshaft, you only want to apply a very light pressure and apply ¾ speed on your flexshaft pedal. These babies are the final step of polishing, so I recommend going through as many grits of sandpaper as you can (I went from 240, 320, 400, 600, 800, 1200). Sanding sticks are a great way to be able to sand flat surfaces and the outside curves of a ring. For the inside of a ring you can use the same sandpapers on a split mandrel. Once you’ve removed all scratches and achieved a nice sanded finish with 1200 grit (or more) you lightly use these Sunshine Buffs both on the inside and outside surfaces. They work awesome. You are going to want to purchase screw mandrels to mount them on (item 333105 @riogrande ) and if you were only to experiment with one size I recommend purchasing the ⅛” H x 1” diameter (item 330180) as they will fit nicely inside a ring. Rio is offering our community 20% off this item 😁🙏🏻(in any of the three sizes with the pinhole center for your flexshaft) through 2/1/19 using code MTLSMITH2 (*This promo is not combinable with Rio's Cyber Sale November 23-26). This is definitely the perfect add-on item to try as they retail for $5.63 for a package of six! *Please be safe and always wear eye protection and a mask when using polishing buffs on the flexshaft! 🙏🏻 #sponsored #metalsmithsociety #riojeweler #metalsmith #jewelrytipoftheday #flexshaft #jewelrytools #polishingjewelry

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


REMOVING A SCRATCH FROM A STONE USING YOUR FLEXSHAFT FROM @chromarocksjewelry

View this post on Instagram

Here is a super useful tool to remove scratches in a stone from @chromarocksjewelry -“This is the ‘Gem Shine Polishing Wheel’ It's great for removing light scratches from stones/cabochons. It works great on opals, turquoise, onyx and others that are higher on the mohs hardness scale. It's hit or miss on softer stones with a hardness under 5 like malachite, coral, or amber. The wheel is filled with a 2000 grit polishing paste. They come in packs of 5 with 1 3/32" mandrel. You can purchase them through @stullerinc and @gesswein1914 To use, get it going in your flex shaft. Apply pressure to the stone until you see some paste flow out. The more pressure, the more paste. Then lighten the pressure and polish until the scratch is removed. Buff and you're done! Also pictured in the video, the lazy smith's workholding solution. Masking tape taped down with one piece sticky side up to keep the stone from flying. 😂” I’m just like 😯 over here. How many of us have slipped and scratched a stone 🙋‍♀️ let’s all share our stories..I’ll start 🤣 it was a gorgeous opal in the final stages of setting 🤦‍♀️ 😭 Huge thanks to Carmen for sharing this awesome tip and also shooting that super fun video with the bonus tip! 🙏🏻😘 #metalsmithsociety #jewelrymakingtip #jewelrycommunity #gemstones #stonesetting #stonesettingtips

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


QUICK CHANGE HANDPIECE

View this post on Instagram

For this week’s #tooltalktuesday I wanted to discuss my Technique Quick Change Handpiece (for 3/32” tools), I gotta start by saying even though I’ve made jewelry on and off since I was in high school I have never used a quick change handpiece. I think I always considered it a sort of luxury, now that I’ve used one for a month I can’t ever imagine not using one! Basically this handpiece replaces the handpiece that comes standard on your Foredom flex shaft and allows you to open and close the collet to change out your bits with a single hand. And without a chuck key (I feel like there should be a meme about the missing chuck key 😂). Since this is the only one I’ve ever used I can’t compare to other brands but I love this Technique one, it saves me SO much time changing out different bits. In the past if I was using something like 3m Radial Bristles (we discussed a few days ago) I might skip some of the grits just due to the amount of time it took to change them out (I know this sounds lazy but I’m just being honest!) Huge thank you to @ottofrei1930 for generously sending me this game changer! As I wrote this it appears theirs is on sale and you can also save an additional 5% off your total order with code MMS719 🙏😘 Would LOVE to hear everyone’s experience with quick change handpieces or whether it’s something on your wish list? #sponsored #honest #jewelrytools #jewelrycommunity

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on


Thank you for stopping by!

I hope you found this helpful! One of the best ways you can support the page is by becoming a patron! Your support of as little as $1 a month, collectively helps the page continue to run! You can also visit the Society Shop!

Read more →

METALSMITH SOCIETY'S TOP SOLDERING TIPS

Posted by Corkie Bolton on

Here are some of the most popular tips that have been shared about stone setting on the Metalsmith Society page!

BINDER CLIPS ON THE END OF CROSS LOCKING TWEEZERS FROM @marionwild

SOLDERING NEST FROM @mothersonthemountainjewelry

SOLDERING A JUMPRING TO A CHAIN WITH SCRAP METAL AS A HEAT SINK FROM @Becca.compton

PAPERCLIP TWEEZERS FOR SOLDERING EARRING POSTS FROM 
@irenezaerajoyas

USING VARIOUS STEEL ITEMS TO PROVIDE A LITTLE LIFT WHILE SOLDERING FROM @amyy50

TECHNIQUE FOR KEEPING DECORATIVE WIRE IN PLACE DURING SOLDERING FROM @thesovereigncrow

USING WOLF CLAY AS A SOLDERING PROP TO POSITION PIECES AND AS A HEAT PROTECT

SOLDERING FINE CHAIN TO A JUMPRING (WITHOUT MELTING) FROM @thebenchmarkcollection

USING LINES ON YOUR SOLDERING BOARD TO ENSURE ALIGNMENT FROM  @pyrus_designs

POSITIONING A JUMPRING OR BAIL FOR SOLDERING FROM 
@umyajewelry

USING A WOODEN DAPPING BLOCK FILLED WITH WATER TO PROTECT A STONE WHILE SOLDERING A REPAIR FROM @sarah.jackson.jewellery 

USING COPPER PENNIES (PRIOR TO 1982) TO LIFT ELEMENTS WHILE SOLDERING FROM @kkbmetalstudio

PREVENTING SOLDER FLOW WITH RONDA CORYELL'S MASKING MUD FROM @knotandsplice 

SECURING ITEMS WHILE SOLDERING FROM @auldmoon

USING A SPLIT MANDREL TO SOLDER A SPLITSHANK EVENLY FROM @meritmade

USING VIGOR HEAT SHIELD TO PROTECT CLASPS WHILE SOLDERING CHAIN 

USING GRAPHITE PENCIL LEADS INSIDE A HINGE WHILE SOLDERING FROM @elmharris

MAKING BALLS IN A CHARCOAL BRICK FROM 
@studiojulessilversmith

USING A PIECE OF FIREBRICK AND CHIL GEL TO PROTECT A STONE WHILE SOLDERING FROM @andreabjewelry

USING GLASS BEADS TO POSITION HINGES DURING SOLDERING FROM @sophiabrand

CREATING A PRONG HOLDER FOR SOLDERING FROM 
@mirieldesign 

WHEN MELTING BALLS, ANGLE YOUR BRICK AND LET THEM DROP INTO WATER FROM @sinead_cleary_jewelry

USING CLAY AS AN ANTI-FLOW FROM @lindablumelstudio

USING A SMALL HONEYSOMB WITH PINS FOR POSITIONING WORK FROM @shinynotions

USING A POTATO AS A HEAT PROTECTANT FROM @makeitkimtoday

USING A TRIVET TO SOLDER BEZELS AND HEAT FROM BELOW

USING YOUR TWEEZERS AS A HEAT SINK WHILE SOLDERING A CHAIN FROM @lumenrosejewelry

PENCIL TO PREVENT SOLDER FLOW FROM @nrjewellerydesign 

USING BROKEN HONEYCOMB BOARD TO POSITION A PIECE FOR SOLDERING FROM @brackendesigns

DIFFERENT OPTIONS FOR SOLDERING SURFACES

View this post on Instagram

For this #tooltalktuesday I wanted to discuss the most common SOLDERING SURFACES (to the best of my knowledge :) First we will discuss the honeycomb soldering board. They are lightweight and have tons of tiny holes, they don’t retain heat and cool quickly. They do reflect heat back onto whatever you are soldering which makes your flame more effective, this does mean you might have slightly more residue and oxidation. They are an ideal choice for soldering most projects except tiny things (which can fall through the holes) this constantly happens with my solder as well. They also make the small circular honeycombs with pins (those come in large and small and that refers to the hole size) and we’ve shown a bunch of tips with those, I love em! Charcoal is another option, they are also heat reflective. Charcoal is great for carving grooves to position small elements into, or sticking pins and binding wire into. For example, if you want to create a perfect ball, create a depression in the charcoal, fill it with scrap, and heat it until it balls. The downside of charcoal is that it is crumbly and will crack when heated. To make a charcoal block last longer, wrap the edges with binding wire and anneal the entire thing before use. The annealing step is thought to stabilize the charcoal. I tend to use hard charcoal as it’s more long lasting! Lastly I own a Solderite Board (calcium silicate) these boards are more dense so they don’t break or flake as easily. I find mine rapidly cools so it can be good for soldering smaller elements that I don’t want to melt. I don’t find myself using it for soldering larger things for that I prefer honeycomb or charcoal. You can also stick pins into solderite boards or even pieces of metal (like prongs) so great for positioning work. Below all of this stuff I have a solid ceramic board, this protects my soldering table and I place my solder on it (hard on one side, medium on the other). Thank you to @benchtooljunkies whose subscription box in February included several soldering surface options and inspired the post! What’s your favorite, what questions do you have? Let us know! #metalsmithsociety #solderingtools #solderingjewelry

A post shared by Metalsmith Society (@metalsmithsociety) on

Thank you for stopping by!

I hope you found this helpful! One of the best ways you can support the page is by becoming a patron! Your support of as little as $1 a month, collectively helps the page continue to run! You can also visit the Society Shop!

Read more →

METALSMITH SOCIETY'S TOP STONE SETTING TIPS

Posted by Corkie Bolton on

Here are some of the most popular tips that have been shared about stone setting on the Metalsmith Society page!

VISUAL TUTORIAL FOR CREATED PRONG SETTINGS FOR CABOCHONS FROM @lucywalkerjewellery


SETTING STONES ATTACHED TO EARRING POSTS FROM @moodichic


USING YOUR PLIERS FOR SHAPING A BEZEL FROM 

Thank you for stopping by!

I hope you found this helpful! One of the best ways you can support the page is by becoming a patron! Your support of as little as $1 a month, collectively helps the page continue to run! 

Read more →

METALSMITH SOCIETY'S TOP POLISHING TIPS

Posted by Corkie Bolton on

One of the most popular topics on the Metalsmith Society page is polishing! Here are some of the most popular tips I've showcased since the beginning.

CREATING A HOOK TO SECURE A CHAIN FOR HAND POLISHING.


ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH WITH POLISHING COMPOUND FROM @normbobby


USING A Q-TIP TO POLISH WITH YOUR FLEXSHAFT FROM 

PROTECT YOUR STONE WITH TAPE WHILE POLISHING FROM 


DIY SCOTCH-BRITE POLISHING MANDREL FROM @corkieboltonjewelry (that's me!)


USING A WOODEN DOWEL TO SECURE A CHAIN FOR POLISHING FROM @vancraftedstudio


YOU CAN ALSO USE A WOODEN DOWEL TO GENERALLY HOLD RINGS WHILE POLISHING FROM @noctuajewellery


POLISHING SMALL SPACES WITH COTTON STRING FROM @alastaircallumjewellery


USING A NAIL BUFF TO SAND AND POLISH FROM @edbshinyobjects


STRIPS OF 3M POLISHING PAPER TO GET INTO TIGHT SPOTS FROM @daveaugustdesign 


HOLDING SMALL ITEMS WHILE POLISHING FROM @annie.lesperance


SUNSHINE CLOTH BUFFS FROM @riogrande


A TIP FOR POLISHING YOUR BEZELS FROM @lejewelrydesigns


REMOVING FIRESCALE WITH LUXOR® BY MERARD POLISHING COMPOUNDS FROM @riogrande 


TURNING YOUR FLEXSHAFT INTO A MINI POLISHING MACHINE


A TIP ON POLISHING SAFELY FROM @letsmakejewelry


USING A DRAWER HANDLE TO STORE PLIERS FROM @elementril_smithing_co


THANK YOU FOR STOPPING BY!

Thank you to all the members of the community who shared these tips! You can find some of the items on my #tooltalktuesday page, shopping those links supports the page! You can also support the page by making a purchase in the Society Shopbecoming a patron or pinning these tips to Pinterest!

Read more →